Hacking on zope.annotation

Getting the Code

The main repository for zope.annotation is in the Zope Foundation Github repository:

You can get a read-only checkout from there:

$ git clone https://github.com/zopefoundation/zope.annotation.git

or fork it and get a writeable checkout of your fork:

$ git clone git@github.com/jrandom/zope.annotation.git

The project also mirrors the trunk from the Github repository as a Bazaar branch on Launchpad:

https://code.launchpad.net/zope.annotation

You can branch the trunk from there using Bazaar:

$ bzr branch lp:zope.annotation

Working in a virtualenv

Installing

If you use the virtualenv package to create lightweight Python development environments, you can work with your checkout using a virtualenv. First, create the virtualenv:

$ /path/to/virtualenv --no-site-packages /tmp/hack-zope.annotation

Next, get this package registered as a “development egg” in the environment:

$ /tmp/hack-zope.annotation/bin/python setup.py develop

Running the tests

Run the tests using the build-in setuptools testrunner:

$ /tmp/hack-zope.annotation/bin/python setup.py -q test -q
running test
............
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Ran 11 tests in 0.000s

OK

The dev command alias downloads and installs extra tools, like the nose testrunner and the coverage coverage analyzer:

$ /tmp/hack-zope.annotation/bin/python setup.py dev
$ /tmp/hack-zope.annotation/bin/nosetests
running nosetests
..........
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Ran 12 tests in 0.000s

OK

If you have the coverage pacakge installed in the virtualenv, you can see how well the tests cover the code:

$ /tmp/hack-zope.annotation/bin/nosetests --with coverage
............
Name                         Stmts   Miss  Cover   Missing
----------------------------------------------------------
zope.annotation                  4      0   100%
zope.annotation.attribute       59      0   100%
zope.annotation.factory         28      0   100%
zope.annotation.interfaces      15      0   100%
----------------------------------------------------------
TOTAL                          106     35    67%
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Ran 12 tests in 2.166s

OK

Building the documentation

zope.annotation uses the nifty Sphinx documentation system for building its docs. Using the same virtualenv you set up to run the tests, you can build the docs:

The docs command alias downloads and installs Sphinx and its dependencies:

$ /tmp/hack-zope.annotation/bin/python setup.py docs
...
$ /tmp/hack-zope.annotation/bin/sphinx-build -b html -d docs/_build/doctrees docs docs/_build/html
...
build succeeded.

You can also test the code snippets in the documentation:

$ /tmp/hack-zope.annotation/bin/sphinx-build -b doctest -d docs/_build/doctrees docs docs/_build/doctest
...
running tests...

Document: narrative
-------------------
1 items passed all tests:
  54 tests in default
54 tests in 1 items.
54 passed and 0 failed.
Test passed.

Doctest summary
===============
   54 tests
    0 failures in tests
    0 failures in setup code
build succeeded.

Using zc.buildout

Setting up the buildout

zope.annotation ships with its own buildout.cfg file and bootstrap.py for setting up a development buildout:

$ /path/to/python2.7 bootstrap.py
...
Generated script '.../bin/buildout'
$ bin/buildout
Develop: '/path/to/annotation/.'
...
Generated script '.../bin/sphinx-quickstart'.
Generated script '.../bin/sphinx-build'.

Running the tests

You can now run the tests:

$ bin/test --all
Running zope.testing.testrunner.layer.UnitTests tests:
  Set up zope.testing.testrunner.layer.UnitTests in 0.000 seconds.
  Ran 11 tests with 0 failures and 0 errors in 0.000 seconds.
Tearing down left over layers:
  Tear down zope.testing.testrunner.layer.UnitTests in 0.000 seconds.

Building the documentation

The zope.annotation buildout installs the Sphinx scripts required to build the documentation, including testing its code snippets:

$ cd docs
$ PATH=../bin:$PATH make doctest html
sphinx-build -b doctest -d _build/doctrees . _build/doctest
running tests...

Document: narrative
-------------------
1 items passed all tests:
  54 tests in default
54 tests in 1 items.
54 passed and 0 failed.
Test passed.

Doctest summary
===============
   54 tests
    0 failures in tests
    0 failures in setup code
build succeeded.
Testing of doctests in the sources finished, look at the  results in _build/doctest/output.txt.
sphinx-build -b html -d _build/doctrees   . _build/html
...
build succeeded.

Build finished. The HTML pages are in docs/_build/html.

Using tox

Running Tests on Multiple Python Versions

tox is a Python-based test automation tool designed to run tests against multiple Python versions. It creates a virtualenv for each configured version, installs the current package and configured dependencies into each virtualenv, and then runs the configured commands.

zope.annotation configures the following tox environments via its tox.ini file:

  • The py26, py27, py33, py34, and pypy environments builds a virtualenv with pypy, installs zope.annotation and dependencies, and runs the tests via python setup.py test -q.
  • The nobtree environment builds a virtualenv with Python 2.7, installs zope.annotation and its minimal dependencies (no persistent or BTrees), and runs the tests via python setup.py test -q.
  • The coverage environment builds a virtualenv with python2.7, installs zope.annotation and dependencies, installs nose and coverage, and runs nosetests with statement coverage.
  • The docs environment builds a virtualenv with python2.7, installs zope.annotation and dependencies, installs Sphinx and dependencies, and then builds the docs and exercises the doctest snippets.

This example requires that you have a working python2.6 on your path, as well as installing tox:

$ tox -e py26
GLOB sdist-make: .../zope.annotation/setup.py
py26 sdist-reinst: .../zope.annotation/.tox/dist/zope.annotation-4.x.ydev.zip
py26 runtests: commands[0]
...
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Ran 11 tests in 0.000s

OK
___________________________________ summary ____________________________________
py26: commands succeeded
congratulations :)

Running tox with no arguments runs all the configured environments, including building the docs and testing their snippets:

$ tox
GLOB sdist-make: .../zope.annotation/setup.py
py26 sdist-reinst: .../zope.annotation/.tox/dist/zope.annotation-4.0.2dev.zip
py26 runtests: commands[0]
...
Doctest summary
===============
  54 tests
   0 failures in tests
   0 failures in setup code
   0 failures in cleanup code
build succeeded.
___________________________________ summary ____________________________________
py26: commands succeeded
py27: commands succeeded
py33: commands succeeded
py34: commands succeeded
pypy: commands succeeded
nobtree: commands succeeded
coverage: commands succeeded
docs: commands succeeded
congratulations :)

Contributing to zope.annotation

Submitting a Bug Report

zope.annotation tracks its bugs on Github:

Please submit bug reports and feature requests there.

Sharing Your Changes

Note

Please ensure that all tests are passing before you submit your code. If possible, your submission should include new tests for new features or bug fixes, although it is possible that you may have tested your new code by updating existing tests.

If have made a change you would like to share, the best route is to fork the Githb repository, check out your fork, make your changes on a branch in your fork, and push it. You can then submit a pull request from your branch:

If you branched the code from Launchpad using Bazaar, you have another option: you can “push” your branch to Launchpad:

$ bzr push lp:~tseaver/zope.annotation/cool_feature

After pushing your branch, you can link it to a bug report on Github, or request that the maintainers merge your branch using the Launchpad “merge request” feature.